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what is the velocity in gas?with formula?

what is the velocity in gas?with formula?

Grade:12

4 Answers

L GOUSE BASHA
316 Points
6 years ago
where vrms is the root mean square of the speed in meters per second, Mm is the molar mass of the gas in kilograms per mole, R is the molar gas constant, and T is the temperature in kelvin. Although the molecules in a sample of gas have an average kinetic energy (and therefore an average speed) the individual molecules move at various speeds and they stop and change direction according to the law of density measurements and isolation, i.e. they exhibit a distribution of speeds. Some move fast, others relatively slowly. Collisions change individual molecular speeds but the distribution of speeds remains the same. This equation is derived from kinetic theory of gases using Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution function. The higher the temperature, the greater the mean velocity will be. This works well for both nearly ideal, atomic gases like helium and for molecular gases like diatomic oxygen. This is because despite the larger internal energy in many molecules (compared to that for an atom), 3RT/2 is still the mean translational kinetic energy. This can also be written in terms of the Boltzmann constant (k) as square root of 3RT/m
Gavvala Ganesh
551 Points
6 years ago
) as square root of 3RT/mk (Boltzmann constant energy. This can also be written in terms of the kinetic translational/2 is still the mean RT. This is because despite the larger internal energy in many molecules (compared to that for an atom), 3oxygen like diatomic molecular gases and for helium function. The higher the temperature, the greater the mean velocity will be. This works well for both nearly ideal, atomic gases like Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution. Although the molecules in a sample of gas have an average kinetic energy (and therefore an average speed) the individual molecules move at various speeds and they stop and change direction according to the law of density measurements and isolation, i.e. they exhibit a distribution of speeds. Some move fast, others relatively slowly. Collisions change individual molecular speeds but the distribution of speeds remains the same. This equation is derived from kinetic theory of gases using kelvin in temperature is the T, and molar gas constant is the R of the gas in kilograms per mole, molar mass is the Mm of the speed in meters per second, root mean square is the rmsvwhere
pa1
357 Points
6 years ago
where vrms is the root mean square of the speed in meters per second, Mm is the molar mass of the gas in kilograms per mole, R is the molar gas constant, and T is the temperature in kelvin. Although the molecules in a sample of gas have an average kinetic energy (and therefore an average speed) the individual molecules move at various speeds and they stop and change direction according to the law of density measurements and isolation, i.e. they exhibit a distribution of speeds. Some move fast, others relatively slowly. Collisions change individual molecular speeds but the distribution of speeds remains the same. This equation is derived from kinetic theory of gases using Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution function. The higher the temperature, the greater the mean velocity will be. This works well for both nearly ideal, atomic gases like helium and for molecular gases like diatomic oxygen. This is because despite the larger internal energy in many molecules (compared to that for an atom), 3RT/2 is still the mean translational kinetic energy. This can also be written in terms of the Boltzmann constant (k) as square root of 3RT/m
venky
235 Points
6 years ago
Gas Velocity. You may, if you wish, read more about the above equation here. The basic idea is that, if you consider each gas molecule's velocity (which has components of both speed and direction), the average velocity of all gas molecules in a sample is zero.

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