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which part of the soap (RCOO-) dissolves grease and form micelle? a) R part (called tail of the anion) b) COO- part (called head of the anion) c) both a and c

which part of the soap (RCOO-) dissolves grease and form micelle?


a) R part (called tail of the anion)


b) COO- part (called head of the anion)


c) both a and c

Grade:

1 Answers

SAGAR SINGH - IIT DELHI
879 Points
10 years ago

Dear student,

The organic part of a natural soap is a negatively-charged, polar molecule. Its hydrophilic (water-loving) carboxylate group (-CO2) interacts with water molecules via ion-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonding. The hydrophobic (water-fearing) part of a soap molecule, its long, nonpolar hydrocarbon chain, does not interact with water molecules. The hydrocarbon chains are attracted to each other by dispersion forces and cluster together, forming structures called micelles. In these micelles, the carboxylate groups form a negatively-charged spherical surface, with the hydrocarbon chains inside the sphere. Because they are negatively charged, soap micelles repel each other and remain dispersed in water.

Grease and oil are nonpolar and insoluble in water. When soap and soiling oils are mixed, the nonpolar hydrocarbon portion of the micelles break up the nonpolar oil molecules. A different type of micelle then forms, with nonpolar soiling molecules in the center. Thus, grease and oil and the 'dirt' attached to them are caught inside the micelle and can be rinsed away.

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