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what is the amphoteric nature of water how do we know that h2o is loosing or gaining electrons

what is the amphoteric nature of water
how do we know that h2o is loosing or gaining electrons

Grade:11

1 Answers

Rahul Kumar
131 Points
9 years ago

Chemically, water is amphoteric — i.e., it is able to act as either an acid or a base. Occasionally the term hydroxic acid is used when water acts as an acid in a chemical reaction. At a pH of 7 (neutral), the concentration of hydroxide ions (OH−) is equal to that of the hydronium (H3O+) or hydrogen (H+) ions. If the equilibrium is disturbed, the solution becomes acidic (higher concentration of hydronium ions) or basic (higher concentration of hydroxide ions).

Water can act as either an acid or a base in reactions. According to the Brønsted-Lowry system, an acid is defined as a species which donates a proton (an H+ ion) in a reaction, and a base as one which receives a proton. When reacting with a stronger acid, water acts as a base; when reacting with a stronger base, it acts as an acid. For instance, it receives an H+ ion from HCl in the equilibrium:

HCl + H2O ? H3O+ + Cl−
Here water is acting as a base, by receiving an H+ ion.

In the reaction with ammonia, NH3, water donates an H+ ion, and is thus acting as an acid:

NH3 + H2O ? NH4+ + OH−

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