Thank you for registering.

One of our academic counsellors will contact you within 1 working day.

Please check your email for login details.
MY CART (5)

Use Coupon: CART20 and get 20% off on all online Study Material

ITEM
DETAILS
MRP
DISCOUNT
FINAL PRICE
Total Price: Rs.

There are no items in this cart.
Continue Shopping

Plsss plss...... for helping me get into nit...pls.. can anyone of u give ur notes on optical isomerism (R/S Configuration & Enantiomers,Diastereomers & Meso compounds) for me to learn from it !!! plzz.....i saw the study material for askiitians and i have a lot of doubts so pls give me crystal clear notes of optical isomerism(from ur coaching class materials or othera !!) Pls post ur reply and help me in my preparation!!! God bless you Your answers are always gonna be approved!!!

Plsss plss......
for helping me get into nit...pls..
can anyone of u give ur notes on optical isomerism (R/S Configuration & Enantiomers,Diastereomers & Meso compounds)
for me to learn from it !!!
plzz.....i saw the study material for askiitians and i have a lot of doubts so pls give me crystal clear notes of optical isomerism(from ur coaching class materials or othera !!)

Pls post ur reply and help me in my preparation!!!

God bless you

Your answers are always gonna be approved!!!

Grade:12

1 Answers

SAGAR SINGH - IIT DELHI
879 Points
10 years ago

Dear student,

The examples of organic optical isomers required at A' level all contain a carbon atom joined to four different groups. These two models each have the same groups joined to the central carbon atom, but still manage to be different:

Obviously as they are drawn, the orange and blue groups aren't aligned the same way. Could you get them to align by rotating one of the molecules? The next diagram shows what happens if you rotate molecule B.

They still aren't the same - and there is no way that you can rotate them so that they look exactly the same. These are isomers of each other.

They are described as being non-superimposable in the sense that (if you imagine molecule B being turned into a ghostly version of itself) you couldn't slide one molecule exactly over the other one. Something would always be pointing in the wrong direction.

 

The essential difference between the two examples we've looked at lies in the symmetry of the molecules.

 

If there are two groups the same attached to the central carbon atom, the molecule has a plane of symmetry. If you imagine slicing through the molecule, the left-hand side is an exact reflection of the right-hand side.

Where there are four groups attached, there is no symmetry anywhere in the molecule.

A molecule which has no plane of symmetry is described as chiral. The carbon atom with the four different groups attached which causes this lack of symmetry is described as a chiral centre or as an asymmetric carbon atom.

The molecule on the left above (with a plane of symmetry) is described as achiral.

Only chiral molecules have optical isomers.

Think You Can Provide A Better Answer ?

Provide a better Answer & Earn Cool Goodies See our forum point policy

ASK QUESTION

Get your questions answered by the expert for free