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Attachment is my question.Please download and answer my with procedure

Attachment is my question.Please download and answer my with procedure

Grade:12

1 Answers

Aravind Bommera
36 Points
8 years ago

An elastic modulus, or modulus of elasticity, is the mathematical description of an object or substance''s tendency to be deformed elastically (i.e., non-permanently) when a force is applied to it. The elastic modulus of an object is defined as the slope of its stress–strain curve in the elastic deformation region:[1] As such, a stiffer material will have a higher elastic modulus.

\lambda \ \stackrel{\text{def}}{=}\  \frac {\text{stress}} {\text{strain}}

where lambda (λ) is the elastic modulus; stress is the restoring force caused due to the deformation divided by the area to which the force is applied; and strain is the ratio of the change caused by the stress to the original state of the object. If stress is measured in pascals, since strain is a dimensionless quantity, then the units of λ are pascals as well.[2]

Since the denominator turns into unity if length is doubled, the elastic modulus becomes the stress induced in the material, when the sample of the material turns double of its original length on applying external force. While this endpoint is not realistic because most materials will fail before reaching it, it is practical, in that small fractions of the defining load will operate in exactly the same ratio. Thus, for steel with a Young''s modulus of 30 million psi, a 30 thousand psi load will elongate a 1 inch bar by one thousandth of an inch; similarly, for metric units, a load of one-thousandth of the modulus (now measured in gigapascals) will change the length of a one-meter rod by a millimeter.

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