Thank you for registering.

One of our academic counsellors will contact you within 1 working day.

Please check your email for login details.
MY CART (5)

Use Coupon: CART20 and get 20% off on all online Study Material

ITEM
DETAILS
MRP
DISCOUNT
FINAL PRICE
Total Price: Rs.

There are no items in this cart.
Continue Shopping

water remains cooler on a hotter day in summer than in winter

water remains cooler on a hotter day in summer than in winter

Grade:9

3 Answers

Arun
25763 Points
3 years ago
The soil is bad conductor of heat . That is heat does not transfer easily through soil . For example you can touch the outside wall of a raging fireplace without feeling much of the heat . In the winters , winds are responsible for the temperature to drop . The surfaces become cold but the cold does not penetrate much into the ground . The ground water thus does not lose its heat as fast as the air above does . So when we pump out ground water it feels warm . Also add to it the friction that is caused when you are pumping water up through the pipe which heats it further . Same reason applies in the opposite direction during summers .However , this explanation is valid only in temperate climates that is most of Asia , Africa , South America . Where the day temperature is 15 degrees to 25 degrees . It is not applicable to areas like Alaska where the temperature goes down to -30 degrees . Then even the ground water become solid ice and is warm no more .
tinasingh
12 Points
3 years ago
In hot summer days, land gets heated up or cooled down faster than water. This is the reason for water breeze during daytime and land breeze during night time. Same applies here too in winter, groundwater remains hotter than the atmosphere and colder during summer. That's why we use air cooler at our home in summer.
For more details visit –pickeronline.com
 
Scholr Boy
87 Points
3 years ago
Use Scholr App for solving doubts and queries.
The soil is a bad conductor of heat. That is heat does not transfer easily through soil. For example, you can touch the outside wall of a raging fireplace without feeling much of the heat. In the winters, winds are responsible for the temperature to drop.  The surfaces become cold but the cold does not penetrate much into the ground. The groundwater thus does not lose its heat as fast as the air above does. So when we pump out groundwater it feels warm.  Also, add to it the friction that is caused when you are pumping water up through the pipe which heats it further. The same reason applies in the opposite direction during summers.
However, this explanation is valid only in temperate climates that are most of Asia, Africa, South America. Where the day temperature is 15 degrees to 25 degrees. It is not applicable to areas like Alaska where the temperature goes down to -30 degrees. Then even the groundwater become solid ice and is warm no more.
 

Think You Can Provide A Better Answer ?

Provide a better Answer & Earn Cool Goodies See our forum point policy

ASK QUESTION

Get your questions answered by the expert for free