Differentiate between Crystalline solids and Amorphous solids?

5 years ago

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Crystalline Solids



Amorphous Solid



1)      They have a regular three dimensional arrangement of atoms, ions or molecules due to which they have well defined geometrical shape.



They do not have regular arrangement of particles, therefore do not have well defined particles.



2)      They have long range order



They have short range order



3)      They have sharp melting point i.e., they melt at a particular temperature.



They do not have sharp melting point i.e., they melt over a range of temperature.



4)      They have high and fixed heat of fusion, i.e., high energy is required to melt 1 mole of crystalline solid.



They do not have fixed heat of fusion.



5)      They are anisotropic, i.e., they have different optical and electrical properties in different directions.



They are isotropic, i.e., they have same properties in all directions.



6)      They are true solids, i.e., they show all the characteristic properties of solids.



They are pseudo – solids, i.e., they do not show all the characteristic properties of solids.



 



 


5 years ago
                                        Crystalline - (1) are true solids
(2) are those solids in which particles are arranged in regular and peroidic manner in 3-d space
(3) have long range order
(4) can be cut into clean surfaces
(5) are made up of unit cell
(6) have fixed or sharp melting point
(7) have definite value for heat of fusion
(8) are aniisotropic

Amorphous - (1) pseudo solids or supercooled liquids
(2) particles not arranged in regular manner
(3) short range orfer
(4) not made up of unit cell
(5) can not be cut into clean surfaces
(6) do not sharp melting pt , they have melting range
(7) do not have fixed value for heat of fusion
(8) are isotropic
9 months ago

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